Grace Kelly Blogathon – The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954)


This is the second of two posts that are part of the 2nd Annual Grace Kelly Blogathon being held over at The Wonderful World of Cinema by Virginie.

Tnx for letting me participate!


toko-ri“Where do we get such men? They leave this ship and they do their job. Then they must find this speck lost somewhere pn the sea. When the find it they have to land on it’s pitching deck. Where do we get such men? ” – Admitral Tarrant

Number of Times Seen – 2 (16 Jun 2008 and 6 Nov 2016)

Brief Synopsis – A veteran Naval aviator flying during The Korean War must deal with the tension of flying dangerous missions after visiting with his family during a leave in Tokyo.

My Take on it – I’ve been a fan of William Holden ever since I saw him in Stalag 17 (1953) and The Bridge on The River Kwai (1957) when I was a kid.

He has always been one of my favorite actors from the 50’s and this movie is another example of him doing an amazing job.

He is easily able to show us the pressure and difficulties felt by naval aviators during war time since they know they must fly dangerous missions while still thinking about their families waiting for them back home.

The rest of the main cast is superb here with Grace Kelly playing Holden’s wife who comes for a visit while he is on leave and they try to make the most of their “little” time together.

Mickey Rooney plays a rescue pilot that everyone loves but has the ability of getting too hot headed when he isn’t saving his friends who have been shot down.

Frederick March plays an Navy Admiral who tries to care for his young pilots like his own children with the realization that war can be Hell for everyone at any given moment.

All three of them have limited screen time, but each play an important role in Holden’s character’s life; wife, father figure and friend and we get to see how these relationships affect him during his struggles while thinking about an upcoming dangerous mission.

Bottom Line – Really shows us the difficulties and dangers endured by Naval Aviators during The Korean War.  Great cast led by Holden makes it all feel quite real. Kelly, Rooney and March are all stellar in their limited roles. The aerial cinematography is amazingly done for its time and we can feel the tension and danger during each flight. The message of the dangers to the pilots during these missions while trying to make it out of the war alive to return to their families is shown quite well. Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – William Holden’s younger brother, Robert Beedle, was a Navy fighter pilot who was killed in action in World War II. After this film was released, he was remembered by his squadron-mates as having been very much like the character of Lt Harry Brubaker. (From IMDB)

Rating – Globe Worthy

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4 thoughts on “Grace Kelly Blogathon – The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954)

  1. Pingback: The 2nd Wonderful Grace Kelly Blogathon Is Here! | The Wonderful World of Cinema

  2. Nice review! 🙂 I love William Holden too! Make sure not to miss my 2nd Golden Boy blogathon in April! 🙂 The rest of the cast is awesome as well as you said. I wished Grace had a bigger role! I own two autographed pictures from Earl Holliman who plays Nestor in the film! 🙂
    Thanks again for your participation!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Movies Reviewed Index A-Z |

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