Genre Grandeur – The Long Riders (1980) – Film and TV 101


westernFor this month’s first review for Genre Grandeur – Westerns, here’s a review of The Long Riders (1980) by Kira of Film and TV 101

Thanks again to Catherine of Thoughts All Sorts for choosing this month’s genre.

Next month’s Genre has been chosen by Sean of SeanMunger.com  We will be reviewing our favorite Nautical Film.

Loosely defined as anything taking place in, on or under the sea or heavily involving the sea.

Representative examples might include stuff like Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Mutiny on the Bounty, The Hunt For Red October, The Enemy Below, Damn the Defiant!, Cast Away, that sort of thing.

Please get me your submissions by the 25th of Feb by sending them to nauticalsean@movierob.net

Try to think out of the box! Great choice Sean!

Let’s see what Kira thought of this movie:

_________________________________

longridersThe tale of the Jesse James gang members, their numerous exploits and their individual fates.

The Long Riders is a sympathetic portrayal of the story of the James-Younger gang that undertook a number of legendary bank robberies as way of revenge. The group, headed up by none other than Jesse James (James Keach), had their share of excitement during their time together, and went down in a blaze of glory when some plucky townspeople call time on their raids.

I’ve always been a fan of westerns – I kind of have to be given that my dad is too. I think it’s fair to say that for an 18-year-old girl, I’ve seen quite a few new and old, traditional and contemporary westerns and have enjoyed most of them. When this month’s Genre Grandeur came up, I thought it was right up my street. I had initially thought about watching something with John Wayne or Robert Mitchum in, but decided to venture a little further out in the end. The Long Riders was a decent western, but not one of my favourites, and here’s why.

The cast of this film is quite an ensemble. You have the two Keach brothers, both Quaids and three of the Carradine clan – more than fitting for a film about a gang that is made up of brothers wouldn’t you say? This benefitted the performances so much as there was a lot of real family ties that already existed. The bonds portrayed on screen just felt so genuine, and I think this made the telling of the story so much more enjoyable to watch.

There was plenty of action in this film, especially in the last half an hour or so. While I am a fan of both slow burners and fast paced movies, I perhaps edge slightly further towards the more high-octane westerns. It was really fun to watch when all the shots were being fired, and it let you see the Jesse James gang in all their glory. One of my favourite scenes in the film was when the men were trapped in a cabin by the Pinkertons chasing them, and they had to break their way through the panelling in the back and take a back route to escape. For me, it’s scenes like that that encapsulate the old west – big shoot-outs and the heroes escaping by the skin of their teeth.

I do have one big issue with the film, however, and while it may seem like a minor detail, it was a big issue for me. Some of the transitions from scene to scene were a bit rushed. the biggest example I can give you of this is at the end of the film when Jesse meets his maker. The big moment happens, and then straightaway the shot cut to the scene of Frank James, played by Stacy Keach, handing himself over to the authorities. This took away so much of the impact of what was one of the biggest blows the film dealt in my opinion, and I really wish that more time had been spent of making the change more meaningful.

All in all, as much as I enjoyed The Long Riders, it didn’t make enough of an impression on me to be amongst my favourite westerns. There were some rip-roaring shoot-outs and I loved the family dynamic that was made so wonderful by the fact that the cast consisted of so many brothers. What damaged the film so much in my eyes was some of the dodgy transitions between scenes. It really impacted some of the biggest moments in the film for me, which is why I cannot place it amongst the ranks of El Dorado or The Good, The Bad And The Ugly. Nonetheless, it was worth seeing, and was an hour and a half of my time well spent.

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One thought on “Genre Grandeur – The Long Riders (1980) – Film and TV 101

  1. Pingback: Genre Grandeur January Finale – Once Upon A Time in the West (1968) – Thoughts All Sorts |

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