90 Days of Oscar Nominees #7 – David Copperfield (1935)


In my attempt to have a more prolific repertoire of Oscar Nominated Films, I have taken it upon myself to watch 90 new Best Picture Nominees that I’ve never seen before between 5 Dec 2017 and The 90th Annual Oscars on 4 Mar 2018.

Here is my 7th review of the 90 chosen Films…

[to young Copperfield] “Boy, as I have frequently had occasion to observe, “When the stomach is empty, the spirits are low.” ” – Mr. Micawber

Number of Times Seen – 1 (8 Dec 2017)

Brief Synopsis – A young orphan boy is taught many lessons in life and love as he meets various personalities on his journeys.

My Take on it – Charles Dickens is an author that I would put in the same category as J.R.R. Tolkien and William Shakespeare; I love their stories but can’t stand the way that they write them because they bore me to death.

I have always heard of this story and the fact that it’s extremely long (1200 pages, I think) and was glad to finally see the written work on screen.

The story itself is quite fascinating to watch unfold and Dickens expertly manages to bring all of the storyline threads and adventures together by the end which comes across as quite satisfying.

The characters are richly developed and we can easily understand what they all are trying to do here.

WC Fields’ character of Micawber stands out among the entire cast of characters and he is the kind of character that I wouldn’t mind meeting in other stories because he is so enjoyable to watch.

I will probably never read this book, but even if this film is just an abridged version of the adventures of David Copperfield, Dickens has proven that he knows how to spin a great and epic tale.

Bottom Line – Such an interesting story that is presented quite well here. Fields stands out among the entire cast and his character is one I would be interested in meeting in other formats. The story is rich in character development and they do a great job of putting together all of the various adventures in the end. I’ve never read the book (and have little desire to), but Dickens definitely knows how to tell epic tales. Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – W.C. Fields’ contract included a clause in which it was specified that he speak with a British accent. He didn’t – and this may have been because he had difficulty memorizing Charles Laughton’s dialogue and eventually had to read his lines off cue cards. Despite much controversy in the press about Micawber having a strong American accent, the director said he felt Fields was “born to play the part”. (From IMDB)

Rating – Globe Worthy

_______________________________________

Check out my *updated* movie stats here

To see my reviews of Oscar Winning Performances check out this link

To see my reviews of all Oscar Best Picture Winners click here (now complete)

Here is a link to my movie index A-Z

3 thoughts on “90 Days of Oscar Nominees #7 – David Copperfield (1935)

  1. Unlike you Rob, I have read David Copperfield (one of my favorite books) and I love Charles Dickens. As to the movie version – it was excellent. They don’t make ’em like this anymore. This was back in the era of classic novels being adapted for the screen on a regular basis – and no one was better at it than the legendary David O. Selznick (see: “Gone With The Wind”). Impeccable casting (yes – Fields was fantastic as Micawber) and all the details just right. This one is a gem.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Movies Reviewed Index A-Z |

  3. Pingback: Did They Get it Right? – Best Picture – Oscars 1935 |

Let me Know what you think!!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.