From the Stars to a Star: Celebrating Dolores Hart Blogathon – Francis of Assisi (1961)


This is the second of two posts dedicated to From the Stars to a Star: Celebrating Dolores Hart Blogathon being held over at Wonderful World of Cinema

Tnx Virginie for letting me take part!

“This could be so, a voice told me to rebuild the Lord’s house. I thought I had to work with stone and mortar, but perhaps I was wrong.” – Francis Bernardone of Assisi

Number of Times Seen – 1 (17 Oct 2018)

Brief Synopsis – After hearing a call from God, a young man gives up his worldly possessions and starts an order dedicated to the teaching of God.

My Take on it – I chose to watch and review this film for this blogathon because the premise sounded interesting and I usually quite enjoy true life biographical epic tales.

They do a nice job presenting the life of Francis of Assisi who was a man who was willing to go to great lengths for his faith in God and his fellow man.

They tell the story quite concisely and we get a clear idea as to the various rationale behind many of the decisions that he makes in the name of serving God over the course of the story.

Bradford Dillman is actually a great choice for the lead despite not really being a lead actor.

This actually helps the fact that we are meant to believe that Francis is an ordinary man who made these vows and the use of a non-leading actor (that everyone would immediately recognize) helps serve that purpose.

Dolores Hart plays a young aristocratic woman who chooses to serve God in her own way instead of being forced into a loveless marriage.

It’s quite ironic that Hart played this role, because just a few years after making this film, she herself heard her calling and became a nun much like her character.

This is an overall good story but it actually only fails because it could have been much more than that, given the fact that this film resonates epic surroundings of the whole premise.

Bottom Line – Interesting biopic that manages to show the lengths some people are willing to go for their faith.  The story is shown quite well and we get to understand the rationale behind his decisions in the name of serving God.  Dillman is the perfect choice for this lead role because he is such an anonymous actor which helps to give more credence to this story. Hart is great as an aristocratic young woman who chooses to serve God in her own way instead of being forced into a loveless marriage. Overall, it’s a good story, but fails to be much more than that. Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – In the film, Dolores Hart plays an aristocratic woman who becomes a nun. In reality, Hart left Hollywood to become a nun in 1963. (From IMDB)

Rating – Globe Worthy (7/10)

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6 thoughts on “From the Stars to a Star: Celebrating Dolores Hart Blogathon – Francis of Assisi (1961)

  1. Hart, still a nun, maybe a Mother Superior at this point, and living in a monastery in Connecticut – is still a voting member of the Actors’ Branch of the Academy. She gets her screeners every year.

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  2. Thanks a lot for this great second contribution! I like how you explain how the actor choice for the leading role was relevant. I never thought about it before! It’s not my most favourite Dolores Hart films, but it surely has its moments and some very interesting characters.

    Like

  3. Pingback: The Dolores Hart Celebrations Start Today! – The Wonderful World of Cinema

  4. Pingback: Many thanks to the participants of the Dolores Hart Blogathon! – The Wonderful World of Cinema

  5. Pingback: Temporal Top Ten – 1961 |

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