Leaving Neverland (2019)


“He was one of the kindest, most gentle, loving, caring people I knew. He helped me.. tremendously. He helped me with my career. He helped me with my creativity. With all those sorts of things. And he also sexually abused me… for seven years.” – Wade Robson

Number of Times Seen – 1 (18 Mar 2019)

Brief Synopsis – Documentary that chronicles the constant abuse of two young boys by pop star Michael Jackson over a period of over seven years and how it affected them in the years since.

My Take on it – This is a film that I heard about when it was shown at Sundance back in January and was quiet interested in seeing what it was all about.

I’ve seen nearly 250 documentaries in the past 6 years and I must say that this film is among the very best of them. (and there are some amazing titles listed here.)

This movie is able to give us access and insight into a vast amount of information and it’s actually unbelievable that they were able to gather such information on such a sore subject that transpired in Hollywood.

I loved the fact that this film just isn’t a film showing what Michael Jackson did but also is able to give us so much insight into how predators are able to take advantage of a child (and his family members) so easily.

They can feel so loved and wanted and it goes to show that anyone can conceivably fall into that snare.

All of the people who were ‘duped’ here still feel as if they did something wring instead of the other way around which is quite natural.

This film goes on to show us how they each have tried to get their lives back on track after such revelations.

The story itself is extremely harrowing to listen to the stories being told by these ‘survivors’ of abuse and the way things are presented is done so amazingly because it allows for the viewer’s mood to easily be changed once things are played out.

AS a parent, there are parts of this film that really enraged me since it’s so hard to believe that a parent would do so many silly things without even realizing how much damage they are allowing to occur.

Love the idea that fatherhood was the trigger for both of these men because it truly is problematic looking at one’s own past and finding faults in such situations, but when one things of their own child in similar circumstances, it’s comepletely mind blowing.

In a similar fashion to O.J.: Made in America (2016), this film is able to give us so much specific details of things that happened in the past and it’s quite difficult to refute the information presented as being completely untrue or embellished.

Although I haven’t yet seen many films in 2019, this is so far my favorite and I will be quite surprised if this film somehow doesn’t make the top 5 (of my top Ten) when I eventually do my 2019 rankings next February.

Bottom Line – One of the most amazing documentaries that I’ve ever seen. The amount of information that they manage to give us is unbelievable. This film is not just a movie trying to show proof that Jackson committed these acts, but instead they also show how it is possible for someone to take advantage of a young child and his family in so many ways and to make them all feel as if they are the ones in the wrong instead of the other way around. The story is quite harrowing to listen to and the way it is done can make one’s mood change so much along the way.  As a parent, parts of this film really enrage me, but since the idea of fatherhood is so prevalent in this film, it actually makes sense that there would be a connection to that fact.  Like O.J.: Made in America (2016), this film gives us so much details about certain events of the past that it’s quite hard to really refute any of the information presented as being false.  My favorite film of 2019 so far and I wont be surprised if it ends up staying quite high on the list when I do my rankings in 11 months from now.  Highly Highly Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – Director Dan Reed said that he hoped viewers of the documentary would “gain an understanding of the psychology of child sexual abuse, because this awful bond that forms between the predator and the victim lasts for years and years and years, and that’s why abuse is not revealed until decades later”. (From IMDB)

Rating – Oscar Worthy (10/10)

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5 thoughts on “Leaving Neverland (2019)

  1. Agree. A harrowing account of Jackson’s behavior. Considering what he did to his own face over the years, I always thought he was “off” and always believed the stories told about his behavior. Added to the mix – was the inexcusable behavior od the parents – especially the mothers – especially one mother – who, no matter what they thought or what they might have tried to convince themselves was going on – there is NO reasonable excuse for letting your young sons (under 10) share a bed/bedroom with a 32 year old man. What the HELL did they THINK was going on? Hopefully – tyou were also able to watch the hour long followup with the 2 men and the director hosted by Oprah Winfrey At the end of the 3 hours – the 2 men – both childhood abuse victims of Jackson – standing up and hugging one another – brought tears to my eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yep. Saw that too. I thought the same about the hug. Didnt know abt anthony edwards before seeing that interview. Was quite impressed that oprah was able to do such an important interview eventhough she was close with mj since her own abuse (along with her advocacy) trumps her friendship.

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      • Not surprised. As she said – well over 200 of her shows during her talk show run were devoted to child abuse etc., knowing the signs, what to do. This follow up to Neverland was right in her wheelhouse.

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  2. Pingback: MovieRob Monthly Roundup – March 2019 | MovieRob

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