Genre Grandeur – A Few Good Men (1992) – Encore Review 2 – MovieRob


For this month’s next review for Genre Grandeur – Movies based on Plays, here’s a review of A Few Good Men (1992) by me.

Thanks again to Virginie of The Wonderful World of Cinema for choosing this month’s genre.

Next month’s genre has been chosen by Barry of Cinematic Catharsis and we will be reviewing our favorite Nature Gone Berserk Movies.

Mother Nature usually takes care of us, with all the oxygen we can breathe, water we drink and cute bunnies we can pet, but what happens when she gets angry? Watch her unleash floods, earthquakes, volcanoes and animals gone mad.

Please get me your submissions by the 25th of Aug by sending them to berserkbarry@movierob.net

Try to think out of the box! Great choice Barry!

Let’s see what I thought of this movie:

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“[sarcastically to Joanne in his apartment] Oh, hah, I’m sorry, I keep forgetting. You were sick the day they taught law at law school.” – Kaffee

Number of Times Seen – Too many to count (Theater in 1992, video, DVD, 3 Nov 2013, 8 Mar 2015 and 29 Jul 2019)

Link to original reviewHere and Here

Brief Synopsis – A military lawyer largely known for plea bargaining cases is assigned to defend two Marines who are accused of murdering a fellow soldier, although they claim that they were following orders.

My Take on it – This was one of my first choices of films to wtach when Virginie chose this month’s genre.

I have been a huge fan of this film ever since it was made 28 years ago.

It was written as a stage play by (the now famous) Aaron Sorkin and he adapted it to the screen for his first real foray into the world of Hollywood.

This is done spectacularly which helps it work on so many levels from start to finish.

The story is set up in a way that it gives us so much insight into the way of life in the military and leaves the viewer with so much to ponder about the way things work when one needs to follow orders.

The cast of this film is superb with Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson and Demi Moore all giving stellar performances.

In addition, the supporting cast is also great with Kevin Bacon, Kevin Pollack, Kiefer Sutherland and JT Walsh all standing out in their specific roles.

The story is presented in a great way that allows the viewer to get a very clear picture of everything going on and it manages to stay fascinating from start to finish because there are some great twists and turns along the way.

Sorkin’s script helps give the story such a great atmosphere that tells such a compelling story that is timeless.

The dialogue is written in a way that injects some humorous lines along the way in order to find a way to help alleviate the very “heavy” nature of the story itself.

This is an extremely quotable film that is still relevant even after nearly 30 years.

This movie is a great example of a film that successfully manages to transform a stage play to screen because having the ability to see the characters in different locations throughout makes it work even better than if they just switched the backgrounds like is done on stage.

The story line is also enhanced due to the changes from stage to screen and allows them to use various visual cues to help make the story more fluid and intact.

The courtroom scenes are quite riveting and work so well here in making the story stay so interesting throughout.

Bottom Line – Amazing film that works so well on numerous levels. The story gives the viewer so much to ponder about the way of life in the military and how things are perceived when one must always follow orders. The cast is superb with Cruise, Nicholson and Moore all giving stellar performances here. The supporting cast is also great and Bacon, Pollack, Sutherland and Walsh all stand out in their roles here.  The story is presented in a great way and allows us to get a clear picture of everything going on which helps make the story so fascinating.  Sorkin does an amazing job creating this story and the atmosphere that it resides in.  The film manages to successfully inject bits and pieces of humor along the way in order to help alleviate the very heavy themes that are dealt with.  Such a quotable film that still remains so relevant to life even after nearly 3 decades. This is a great example of how one can successfully transform a stage play to the screen even by making various visual changes that help enhance the storyline. The courtroom scenes are spectacular and work so well to help keep things so interesting.  Highly Highly Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – Jack Nicholson repeated his famous courtroom monologue as Colonel Jessep off-camera several times so Rob Reiner could film the reactions of other actors and actresses from various angles. Nicholson’s memorable on-camera performance was filmed last, but according to Reiner and the other cast members, Nicholson gave it his all every take as if he was on camera. Nicholson said he was “quite spent” by the time he finished. (From IMDB)

Rating – Oscar Worthy (10/10) (no change from original review)

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2 thoughts on “Genre Grandeur – A Few Good Men (1992) – Encore Review 2 – MovieRob

  1. Pingback: Genre Grandeur July Finale – Blithe Spirit (1945) – The Wonderful World of Cinema | MovieRob

  2. Pingback: Temporal Top Ten – 1992 | MovieRob

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