Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided (2001)


“Life on the frontier was punishing. The ceaseless work, the isolation and always the threat of sickness and death. ” – Narrator

Number of Times Seen – 1 (24 Oct 2019)

Brief Synopsis – In-depth biography of the 16th President of The United States of America and his wife.

My Take on it –  This is a film that I came across by accident and was surprised to see how enjoyable and informative it was about the life of Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary Todd Lincoln.

This film is quite comprehensive and even at 6 hours, it feels as if there must be more to discuss about these political giants.

This film tells the story of both of their lives and explains how they became the people that we know who led the Country during the dark days of the Civil War.

Despite this film being 6 hours long, it isn’t boring at all and moves along at a steady pace which allows for the viewer to learn so much about their lives along the way.

They find a way to integrate the information that is well known in the history books with little known details of their lives that are gleaned from various sources like personal correspondence, pictures and even the thoughts and opinions of the various scholars who have served as their biographers over the years.

This helps enhance the story of their lives and allows us to get a better understanding of everything that they did.

The use of ive action reenactments of certain events also adds so much to the enjoyment of this documentary.

They also help us better comprehend who these people were by the use of many anecdotes about their lives and that in and of itself helps explain how these two humble people became known as one of the most important couples to even inhabit the White House and lead the country through very troubling times.

Bottom Line – Such a comprehensive look at their lives and what made them the people who they became. This film is 6 hours long yet never feels like it because it is constantly moving along at a great pace which allows the viewer to learn so much about this “First Couple”  The film utilizes the various sources of information about their lives that are interpreted by the very diverse group of biographers of this couple who help us understand everything that they experienced over the course of their lives.  The way that the film uses live action reenactments along with many correspondences and pictures helps make things even more interesting to watch.  This film brings us so many interesting anecdotes about their lives that allows for us to get a very clear picture of who they were and why they were among the best couple to have ever populated the White House.  Highly Highly Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – Admitted to the Illinois bar in 1836, he moved to Springfield, Illinois, and began to practice law under John T. Stuart, Mary Todd’s cousin. Lincoln developed a reputation as a formidable adversary during cross-examinations and closing arguments. He partnered with Stephen T. Logan from 1841 until 1844. Then Lincoln began his practice with William Herndon, whom Lincoln thought “a studious young man” (From Wikipedia)

Rating – Oscar Worthy (10/10)

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2 thoughts on “Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided (2001)

  1. Pingback: Movies Reviewed Index A-Z | MovieRob

  2. Pingback: MovieRob Monthly Roundup – October 2019 | MovieRob

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