Dead Reckoning (1947)


“I hated every part of her but I couldn’t figure her out yet. I wanted to see her the way Johnny had. I wanted to hear that song of hers with Johnny’s ears. Maybe she was alright. And maybe Christmas comes in July. But I didn’t believe it.” – Captain Warren ‘Rip’ Murdock

Number of Times Seen – 1 (4 Nov 2019)

Brief Synopsis – A soldier tracks down his former friend who disappeared on their way to Washington in order to recieve medals for their service.

My Take on it – I came across this film during my request quest to try and watch more films starring Humphrey Bogart in order to get a broader scope of his work.

The premise of this film works really well largely due to the way that they allow the mystery to play out throughout the course of the film.

The plot is filled with some great twists and turns along the way that help make both the lead character and the audience constantly waiver about what is truly transpiring.

Bogart is great in the lead as he is able to play this character slightly different than most of his other performances which helps make the viewer forget that Bogie is playing this character.

His chemistry with co-star Lizbeth Scott is on and off throughout the film and that actually seems as if it is done purposefully in order to help make things seem even more suspenseful and suspicious.

The choice to tell most of this story in flashback form actually works really well since it makes things feel even more thrilling.

This also allows the audience and the priest being told the story the ability to gain a broader perspective of what is really going on.

Bottom Line – Interesting idea that works due to the way that the mystery plays out. The story is filled with some great twists and turns along the way that make the lead character and the audience constantly trying to figure out the truth. Bogart is great in the lead because he plays his character in a way that is quite different from what we are used to seeing him in. His chemistry with Scott is on and off but that seems to be more on purpose than not. The way that the story is told mostly in flashback helps keep things even more suspenseful while also allowing both the viewer and the priest hearing the story to gain a lot of perspective on the story being told. Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – In the train scene, after they discover that Drake is to receive the Medal of Honor, Murdock quips that maybe the president will let Drake “sit on top of his piano”. This is a reference to a then-scandalous photo of Harry Truman playing piano with a leggy blonde on top that was taken at the National Press Club in 1945. The blonde was Lauren Bacall. (From IMDB)

Rating – Globe Worthy (8/10)

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One thought on “Dead Reckoning (1947)

  1. Pingback: Temporal Top Ten – 1947 | MovieRob

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