Genre Grandeur – Anna and the Apocalypse (2017) – The People’s Movies


For this month’s next review for Genre Grandeur – Horror-Comedy Films here’s a review of Anna and the Apocalypse (2017) by Paul of the People’s Movies.

Thanks again to Aaron Neuwirth of the Code is Zeek  for choosing this month’s genre.

Next month’s genre has been chosen by Paul of the People’s Movies and we will be reviewing our favorite Loners in Film.

Please get me your submissions by the 25th of Mar by sending them to lonerpaul@movierob.net

Try to think out of the box! Great choice Paul!

Let’s see what Paul thought of this movie:

__________________________________________

Director: John McPhail. With: Ella Hunt, Malcolm Cumming, Sarah Swire, Mark Benton, Paul Kaye. UK 2017. 107 mins.

After beheading a zombie snowman Anna and her best friend John must sing and dance their way through the devolution of society to reach their loved ones and possible survival.

This niche coming of age flick is potentially prone to stumbling around like the old school zombies it features, struggling to locate its target audience. The tone swings wildly between dangerously twee show tunes and full-on splatter while the spicy language threatens to undermine its inherent charm. It is so desperate to gain the cult status label that it often compromises its feel-good agenda.

However, having said all that, it manages to hold the attention and ambush your affections through the sheer infectiousness of its disgustingly talented young cast. Ella Hunt is the pick of the bunch as the titular Anna in a sassy performance that clearly points to stellar things. Paul Kaye keeps the grown-up end of the cast afloat with a remarkably weird performance as the headmaster. At times he appears to be channelling a psychopathic Fagin through the conduit of the principal from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.

The singing is on point and the songs themselves are catchy and lyrically sound, although there is at least one too many clogging up the narrative. The dance choreography is refreshingly simple with sly trinkets of witty visual humour and an amiable naturalness.

Some of the character development is impossibly trite, but this is a musical after all and otherwise, it is structurally sturdy if a tad overlong.

It is a hard film to advocate as the reaction to its unusual mixture of genres will be almost entirely personal. It’s just as easy to see this flick becoming a perennial Christmas darling for many people as it is to see it derided as a despised bastardisation by many others.

Only a wider release will tell if it will grow into an adored sensation or not, but I suspect it will top quite a few best of year lists. In the meantime, this is a brave and committed flick that deserves to be applauded for its modernity and sense of fun.

Give it a go because there is a high chance it will put a grin on your face, and who doesn’t need that these days, and may just wheedle its way into your heart forever.

[rating=4]

Let me Know what you think!!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.